New Study Suggests Morning People are Healthier & Perform Better at Work

New Study Suggests Morning People are Healthier & Perform Better at Work

According to new research recently published in the journal Occupational and Environmental Medicine, there are certain sets of genes, known as chronotypes, “appear to be directly linked to how much sleep you may get and how you perform at work.

 

 According to IFLScience.com, Researchers in Finland examined data from the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 Study and, based on questions regarding their sleep patterns, were divided into three different groups; a morning person, called M-type, and evening person, called E-type, or an intermediate chronotype. "Most men were either M-type (46%) or intermediate (44%), with just 10% being E-type. Women were very similar, with 44% being M-type, 44% intermediate, and 12% E-type. The skew may be due to the age of the population, with older people often waking earlier than adolescents and young adults."

 

They found E-types, when compared to M-types, were worse off in a number of ways, including getting less sleep and being more likely to be unmarried and unemployed. They were also found to underperform at work significantly more often than M-types, with around 1 in 4 reporting work issues. 

 

These findings are in line with previous research, but the writers of this study suggest that chronotypes should be taken into account when planning work schedules of employees to optimize performance and ensure their best health.